Category: media

  • A story about screens

    A story about screens

    How we’ve come to embrace factoids in place of knowledge “Fahrenheit 451” came out in 1966. François Truffaut directed the British dystopian science fiction film—his only not in French language and first in color. Based on the 1953 novel of the same name by Ray Bradbury, it showcased Truffaut’s love of books. The film, which…

  • Why we need cinema

    Why we need cinema

    Stories continue to ignite our imagination. I used to love going to the movies. From the black and white projections on Sunday afternoon at the parish we watched munching on a licorice roll, to the four-hour marathons of re-releases, to the open theaters in summer. The lights dim, the screen comes to life, and so…

  • The summer of lore

    The summer of lore

    How Eras, Renaissance, and Barbie are signaling the desire to find a personal way out of the morass of the ‘data-driven’ perspective of our own making. I haven’t gone to see “Barbie.” I don’t know if I will. Cinema theaters are not a favorite space. Though I do love open theaters, like the one in…

  • The Paradox of Our Age

    The Paradox of Our Age

    Do we still know how to recognize value? I started my writing career ever since I published my very first poem to the bulletin board in our apartment building. I was six. It happened at about the same time I gave my first public speech at a school reunion. The fate of my textbook was…

  • Private truths, public lies

    Private truths, public lies

    How we cannot help our nature―but we can improve our culture. A man in the semi-distance looks inside the apartment across and the yard below. From the activities taking place in view, he develops a narrative piecing together body language and action clues. Third party observational narrative feels real to the moviegoer who becomes immersed…

  • Stereotypes

    Stereotypes

    The soundtrack that flattens culture to amplify margins—the gain temporary, the collateral effects long-lasting. But it doesn’t have to be that way. It’s what you get when you try to compress a whole idea into a formula. An attempt to capture a category of things with a simple, generalized belief. You declare: ‘I expect you’re…

  • Making Headlines with the Wrong Story

    Making Headlines with the Wrong Story

    Instead of investigating the funneling of Euroscepticism into Brexit and the reasons why Britain, once a land of ambitious colonizers, is descending into a dramatic spiral, The Economist decides to make fun of Italy. Perhaps cucumber on pizza (must be a British thing) can paper over the Government’s embarrassment for the ridiculous twists and turns…

  • How Disinformation Became Part of the Current Narrative

    How Disinformation Became Part of the Current Narrative

      Genuine two-way communication is not just dissemination. Information doesn't equal indoctrination. There's a line between getting attention and agitprop. Providing proof or evidence is not the same as the truth. Truth is a conclusion the other person gets to make. These were some of the principles I discussed in a conversation at Web 2.0…

  • Is the Internet a Significant Break from the Past?

    Is the Internet a Significant Break from the Past?

    And if so, how should we think about what we do with it? Innovation is not a single thing, a eureka (Greek for I have found) moment. There are many factors that go into taking a discovery to making an impact. Bringing something new to the world means standing on the shoulders of giants across…

  • What if Ordinary People had Actual Power in Social Media Platform Decisions?

    What if Ordinary People had Actual Power in Social Media Platform Decisions?

      If it were up to me — and many other people who love using Twitter to find ideas — Twitter lists would have been a much better product. Better than hashtags, Twitter lists are a simple way to signal interest and focus. The image above in just a small snapshot of the lists other…