Category: culture

  • Transversal gliding

    Transversal gliding

    How to design controls to suit interaction with humans. ChatGPT3 took a glance at my blog of 16 years. It summarized its philosophical depth and ‘transversal gliding’ as follows: Valeria’s work is a fascinating case study for your method of ‘transversal gliding.’ She navigates through multiple dimensions—business, culture, technology, and strategy—much like a transversal designer…

  • Mega and meta

    Mega and meta

    They’ve been human aspirations before they were concepts and companies—they were complicated ideas that are now complex. Some words we use, some words we abuse. Mega- —from Ancient Greek μέγας, mégas in Latin—is a unit prefix in metric systems of units denoting a factor of one million (10 to the 6the power or 1,000,000.) Literally…

  • Silicon Valley found religion

    Silicon Valley found religion

    The biggest players in AI push messianic tech-utopia through mass media. It’s making us miserable. America is enamored with magic. Its cultural belief in the power of manifestation, energy, and positive thinking goes way back. “Learn how to use the concept of the reality distortion field (RDF) to bend reality in your favor and achieve…

  • You can’t reach the heart through the brain

    You can’t reach the heart through the brain

    Why we muck around with stories. We spend our lives learning things the hard way. For many reasons. Our brains are busy with our own stuff. It’s an issue of trusting the source. We assume things that are happening or have happened don’t apply to us. There’s no apparent value in use for the accumulated…

  • A mile wide, an inch deep

    A mile wide, an inch deep

    Meandering the inner workings of the human psyche When I started Conversation Agent (the blog) 17 years ago, people began sending me all sorts of things. I got tons of press releases and requests to review sites. I got added to site aggregators, and started receiving solicitations for calls (no, thank you) and link exchanges…

  • Why we need to reclaim the art of making conscious decisions

    Why we need to reclaim the art of making conscious decisions

    The increasing number of choices that are decided for you. There was a time when most of the travel I did was for business. Up to a dozen trips a year, sometimes more. Everywhere I went, there were people to meet in companies or catch up with at conferences or at airports. I made plenty…

  • A story about screens

    A story about screens

    How we’ve come to embrace factoids in place of knowledge “Fahrenheit 451” came out in 1966. François Truffaut directed the British dystopian science fiction film—his only not in French language and first in color. Based on the 1953 novel of the same name by Ray Bradbury, it showcased Truffaut’s love of books. The film, which…

  • I paid $300 to have a good night sleep, and all I got was a room

    I paid $300 to have a good night sleep, and all I got was a room

    Effective complaints are win-win on value I spent the night of early October 2016 at a Hotel in Boston. It was a non refundable reservation I paid for in advance at Expedia. With taxes, it came to $300. Wouldn’t you agree with me that that amount should have bought me a good night sleep? But that…

  • Why we need cinema

    Why we need cinema

    Stories continue to ignite our imagination. I used to love going to the movies. From the black and white projections on Sunday afternoon at the parish we watched munching on a licorice roll, to the four-hour marathons of re-releases, to the open theaters in summer. The lights dim, the screen comes to life, and so…

  • How ‘Revenge’ Ruined Travel

    How ‘Revenge’ Ruined Travel

    We closed down just as the world started reopening up. ‘Revenge travel’ is a media buzzword we can trace back to 2021. Just when the world began to reopen. It was than that people decided to make up for lost time. The thought of avenging or punishing goes with the idea that the virus was…