Nets Work against Malaria


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A few years ago, I worked with a colleague, David, who was originally from Johannesburg, South Africa. The son of a medical doctor, he served in the military, and later became an entomologist.

For years before I met him, he had worked for a chemical company that helped supply treated bed nets to help save African children from the deadly bites of mosquitoes.

Malaria is a disease of massive proportions that disproportionately impacts children. Each year, about 780,000 people die from malaria. 85 percent of them are children under the age of 5. The World Health Organization, UNICEF, Malaria Journal, World Malaria Report show that:

  • If universal malaria prevention can be achieved by 2010 and maintained until 2015, an estimated 2.95 million African children’s lives can be saved.
  • If current scale-up trends are maintained until 2015, 1.14 million African children’s lives can be saved.
  • If funding ceases and prevention levels are allowed to fall, an estimated 476,000 additional children would die.

In July, the Bill & Melinda Gates foundation released an interactive infographic that shows an overview of the progress made by individual conuntries and the impact the foundation is having on the number of lives saved globally.

Like my colleague David and the organization he worked with, the foundation is looking to make a progress in preventing and treating malaria. Indeed, we can do more, together.

Which is why today is End Malaria Day. This is an initiative spearheaded by Box of Crayons, The Domino Project, and Malaria No More.

They're doing this by giving $20 from the purchase of each copy of End Malaria to Malaria No More to send a mosquito net to a family in need and to support life-saving work in the fight against malaria.

Learn about the cause and how you can help.

Nets work against malaria. And so does a network of dedicated people.

 

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